Sneak Peak: Celebrating a Costa Rican Independence Abroad

Daniel Colón is a student at Norwich University and an ISA Featured Photo Blogger.  He is currently studying abroad with ISA in Heredia, Costa Rica.

On Monday, September 15, 2014 Costa Rica celebrated it’s 193rd Independence day. We had just returned from a weekend of whitewater rafting and laying on the beach in Puerto Viejo. On our trip back we drove by a huge group of runners carrying a flaming torch. The torch was carried from Guatemala to the Capital of Costa Rica symbolizing Costa Rica’s liberation from Guatemala and the Spanish Empire.

The next morning a group of us headed to downtown Heredia to witness one of the largest parades in the country. Streets were blocked and thousands swarmed around the central park in Heredia, which marked the end of the parade route. In order to get a view many climbed on window sills, rooftops, walls, trees and fences. I made friends with a few locals as we sat on top of a fence watching as each group in the parade gave it’s final performance before exiting the parade route.

My friends and I thought the parade was amazing, but I can only imagine what the parade must look like through a Costa Rican's eyes.
My friends and I thought the parade was amazing, but I can only imagine what the parade must look like through a Costa Rican’s eyes.
Many kids dressed in traditional attire, representing the colors of the Costa Rican Pride. People were dancing salsa and merengue all over the streets, even the young children.
Many kids dressed in traditional attire, representing the colors of the Costa Rican Flag. People were dancing salsa and meringue all over the streets, even the young children.
Many kids were seen wearing a barba o bigotes (beard or mustache) of some sort. The barbas y bigotes were meant to resemble the Campesinos, or hard workers of Costa Rica!
Many kids were seen wearing a barba o bigote (beard or mustache). The barbas y bigotes were meant to resemble the Campesinos, or hard workers of Costa Rica!
Los Payasos! Clowns were painting faces and handing out balloons all over the city!
Los Payasos! Clowns were painting faces and handing out balloons all over the city!
So many clowns, this payaso helped my friends and I out with directions!
So many clowns, this payaso, helped my friends and I out with directions!
The parade lasted for almost 4 hours, ending just around 1pm. Thousands came to see, many arriving early just to get a good seat on the side of the road.
The parade lasted for almost four hours, ending just around 1 p.m. Thousands came to see, many arriving early just to get a good seat on the side of the road.
Thousands of Ticos, or Costa Ricans, stood at the end of the parade where each group did a final performance.
Many Ticos, or Costa Ricans, stood at the end of the parade where each group did a final performance.

Author: Daniel Colón

I'm a Senior at the oldest private military college and will be serving in the US Army after graduation. Photography is a huge hobby of mine, I've had two photos published in a small organization's magazine, but would love to have more published. I have over 12,000 photos on my laptop, so I take a lot….I'm starting to sell my photos, separate of the ones I post on the ISA blog, so if you want to help support my work or help me with my 4 month adventure in Costa Rica, check back later for my other website and more details! Pura Vida!

One thought

Leave a Reply